Graduate Ph.D. Degrees

The Department of Classics offers three programs leading to the PhD degree:

    1. Ph.D. in Classical Studies
      (Traditional, Full-Time, On-Campus)
    2. Ph.D. in Latin and Roman Studies
      (Distance Option 1)
    3. Ph.D. in Classical Civilization 
      (Distance Option 2)

1. Ph.D. in Classical Studies

The program in classical studies is a traditional course of study in Greek and Latin language and literature that prepares students for careers in research and teaching at colleges and universities.

Assistantships and Fellowships

Students awarded a TA position receive a stipend plus a full tuition waiver. The University also offers competitive fellowships. The department routinely provides research fellowships for its Ph.D. candidates. Department awards are also available for study abroad opportunities. Students are expected to become Florida residents after one year.

REQUIREMENTS:

Course Work
Sixty hours total beyond the MA. The sixty hours include:

  • Five seminars in Classics (15 hours at the 5000 or 6000 level)
  • Three of the following seminars (9 hours): Proseminar; Classical Research Tradition; Latin Prose Composition; The Roman Tradition; Greek Prose Composition; The Greek Tradition
  • Elective course work at the 5000-6000 level (9 hours)

Beyond these courses, which typically total thirty-three hours, an additional twenty-seven hours are required for a total of sixty hours beyond the MA (or ninety hours beyond the BA). These additional twenty-seven hours may be earned through additional seminars, independent study projects (including those leading to examinations), supervised teaching, additional elective course work, advanced research (GRW or LNW 7979), and dissertation research (GRW or LNW 7980). The university requires that 30 hours of doctoral work be completed in residence on campus. Application for credit for previous graduate work in other departments or at other institutions must be submitted by the third semester of doctoral study.

Ph.D. Reading List

Examinations and Dissertation

  • 7 Written examinations (as specified below)
  • Comprehensive preliminary oral examination (including a presentation of a dissertation-prospectus)
  • Dissertation
  • Final examination/public defense of the dissertation

Written Examinations in Classical Philology

(i-ii) Comprehensive Reading Examinations in Greek and Latin
Two three-hour translation examinations, one in Greek and one in Latin. Each examination will present the student with four to six passages (in prose and in poetry), approximately 165-190 words per prose passage and 20-25 lines per poetry passage. Students should pass both examinations by the end of the second semester of their second year. If a student’s performance on either exam is not acceptable, the examination may be retaken. Any student who fails to pass a reading exam on the third attempt is subject to dismissal from the program. Only in exceptional cases will a student who has failed to pass both examinations be allowed to proceed to a third year.

(iii-iv) Comprehensive Examinations in the History of Classical Literature in its Historical Context
Two two-hour examinations on all aspects of the development and history of Classical literature (one on Greek literature and one on Roman literature). Students should be able to identify, date, and describe the works of all major authors from Homer to Augustine. Factual knowledge will be tested through identification questions and short answer. Passages may also be submitted for identification, scansion, and commentary. Longer essays on literary issues or topics requiring the student to place authors, works, or genres in historical context will also be included. Students are urged to complete these examinations no later than January of their third year in the PhD program. Any student who fails to pass either exam on the third attempt is subject to dismissal from the program.

(v) Special Author or Special Topic
Typically a 15-25 page paper or a two-hour examination on the work of an author or on a literary or historical topic studied in depth under the direction of a major professor. Depending on the student’s area of research, this exam may include a set of authors. Students are required to complete this examination before the end of the Spring semester of their third year in the PhD program.

(vi-vii) Foreign Language Proficiency
A student may demonstrate proficiency in two modern languages (typically French and German, but Italian or modern Greek may be substituted depending on the student’s area of study) by completing an approved graduate reading knowledge course with a grade of at least a B or by passing an exam administered by the Department of Classics. The student should meet the proficiency requirement in both languages by the end of the second year in the Ph.D. program.

2. Ph.D. in Latin and Roman Studies (Distance Learning Option 1)

This program is designed for high school teachers and community college teachers who wish to improve their skills, prepare for serious research, and improve their credentials with a special emphasis in Latin literature and Roman history.

Most students in the distance learning track will not be taking course work in the traditional, full time manner. Instead, we expect that there will be considerable use of special summer courses, independent study, shared courses at other SUS campuses, as well as distance education course work through the web and other means. Also, students transferring into this program from other institutions will have greatly differing needs. For all these reasons, it would be difficult to construct a program of course work for a typical student in each track since there will be no “typical” student. Instead, listed below are the general requirements for these tracks, from which students, in consultation with the department’s faculty, will make up their individualized program of study.

Requirements

Course Work
Sixty hours total beyond the MA. Thirty of the sixty hours must cover:

  • Five seminars in Classics (15 hours)
  • Latin prose composition (3 hours)
  • Elective course work at the 5000-6000 level (9 hours)
  • Proficiency in German; proficiency in Italian or French
  • Supervised teaching or pedagogy (3 hours)

Beyond these courses, which total thirty hours, an additional thirty hours are required for a total of sixty hours beyond the MA (or ninety hours beyond the BA. study. These additional credits may be earned through independent study projects, including those leading to examination, supervised teaching, additional elective course work, and dissertation research (CLA 7979). The university requires that 30 hours of doctoral work be completed in residence on campus. Residency requirements can be satisfied through participation in the department’s intensive, on-campus two-week summer institutes.Application for credit for previous graduate work (MA + up to 15 hours) must be made by the third semester of Ph.D.

Examinations and Dissertation

  • Written examinations (as specified below)
  • Comprehensive oral examination and prospectus defense
  • Dissertation
  • Public defense of the dissertation

Written Examinations in Latin and Roman Studies

N.B. Ideally, students would write their exams during the summer of their fourth year, but we understand and expect that the exact scheduling of these exams will vary, depending on each student’s other particular goals.

  • (i) Comprehensive Latin reading examination
    A two-hour examination in Latin translation. The examination will present the student with four passages (two in prose, two in poetry) selected from the reading lists. The student will translate three of the four passages. Any student who fails to pass the reading exam on the third attempt is subject to dismissal from the program.
  • (ii) Comprehensive examination in the history of Latin literature in historical context
    A four-hour examination on all aspects of the development and history of Latin literature. Students should be able to identify, date, and describe the works of all major authors from Livius Andronicus to Augustine. Factual knowledge will be tested through identification questions and short answer. Passages may also be submitted for scansion and commentary (but not translation). Longer essays on literary issues or topics requiring the student to place authors, works, or genres in historical context will also be included. Any student who fails to pass the exam on the third attempt is subject to dismissal from the program.
  • (iii) Special topic
    A two-hour examination or a 15-25 page paper on the work of an author or on a literary or historical topic studied in depth under the direction of a major professor. (Please refer also to the description in the introduction.) This examination may be replaced by a paper

Please refer to the introduction for descriptions of the oral examination, prospectus defense,advancement to candidacy, dissertation work, and public defense of the dissertation.

3. Ph.D. in Classical Civilization (Distance Learning Option 2)

This program is designed for high school teachers and community college teachers who wish to improve their skills, prepare for serious research, and improve their credentials with a more general emphasis in classical civilization.

Most students in the distance learning track will not be taking course work in the traditional, full time manner. Instead, we expect that there will be considerable use of special summer courses, independent study, shared courses at other SUS campuses, as well as distance education course work through the web and other means. Also, students transferring into this program from other institutions will have greatly differing needs. For all these reasons, it would be difficult to construct a program of course work for a typical student in each track since there will be no “typical” student. Instead, listed below are the general requirements for these tracks, from which students, in consultation with the department’s faculty, will make up their individualized program of study.

Requirements

Course Work
Sixty hours total beyond the MA. Thirty of the sixty hours must cover

  • Five seminars in Classics (15 hours), three of which must be in Latin
  • Elective course work at the 5000-6000 level (12 hours)
  • Proficiency in German; proficiency in Italian or French
  • Supervised teaching or pedagogy (3 hours)

Beyond these courses, which total thirty hours, an additional thirty hours are required for a total of sixty hours beyond the MA (or ninety hours beyond the BA. study. These additional credits may be earned through independent study projects, including those leading to examination, supervised teaching, additional elective course work, and dissertation research (CLA 7979). The university requires that 30 hours of doctoral work be completed in residence on campus. Residency requirements can be satisfied through participation in the department’s intensive, on-campus two-week summer institutes.Application for credit for previous graduate work (MA + up to 15 hours) must be made by the third semester of Ph.D.

Examinations and Dissertation

  • Written examinations (as specified below)
  • Comprehensive oral examination and prospectus defense
  • Dissertation
  • Public defense of the dissertation

Written Examinations in Classical Civilization.

N.B. Ideally, students would write their exams during the summer of their fourth year, but we understand and expect that the exact scheduling of these exams will vary, depending on each student’s particular goals.

  • (i) Comprehensive examination in the history of Classical literature in historical context
    A four-hour examination on all aspects of the development and history of Classical literature. Students should be able to identify, date, and describe the works of all major authors from Homer to Augustine. Factual knowledge will be tested through identification questions and short answer. Longer essays on literary issues or topics requiring the student to place authors, works, or genres in historical context will also be included. Any student who fails to pass this exam on the third attempt is subject to dismissal from the program.
  • (ii) Special topic 1
    A two-hour examination on a literary or historical topic studied in depth under the direction of a major professor. (Please refer also to the description in the introduction.) Any student who fails to pass this exam on the third attempt is subject to dismissal from the program.
  • (iii) Special topic 2
    A two-hour examination or a 15-25 page paper on the work of an author or on a literary or historical topic studied in depth under the direction of a major professor. (Please refer also to the description in the introduction.)

Please refer to the introduction for descriptions of the oral examination, prospectus defense, advancement to candidacy, dissertation work, and public defense of the dissertation.